MUST READ: On Democracy

Originally posted on facebook notes

by Khalil Vasquez

de·moc·ra·cy [ di mókrəssee ]   Greek a) from demos = people, and b) kratos = power

  1. free and equal representation of people: the free and equal right of every person to participate in a system of government, often practiced by electing representatives of the people by the majority of the people
  2. democratic nation: a country with a government that has been elected freely and equally by all its citizens
  3. democratic system of government: a system of government based on the principle of majority decision-making

This was Found in; Encarta World English Dictionary.

Is Amerikkka of any of these three definitions? The founding Fathers philosophized about democracy and equality, or so it would seem. With the exclusion of Women, people of color (Amerindians and African Slaves mostly at that time), and even poor white males who were not economically nor socially privileged, Democracy in the U.S was anything but a “majority will of the people”. PhD. in Political Science Micheal Parenti canonizes best, in his book; “Democracy for the Few”. In fact this is a settler nation since its inception, had the function of being a democracy of the few rich, and powerful white men.

Felons are a large constituent of unrecognized people. According to Time.com; currently, over 5.3 million people in the USA are denied the right to vote because of felony disenfranchisement. This nullifies 2. Felons are considered citizens, but they cannot vote, approximately 70% of these felons are men of Color and virtually all of them are working class men who were already born poor and underprivileged. There is a direct correlation between men of color in low-class neighborhoods being the most unemployed, achieving the least in education, and generally existing as the most proletarianized, in conjunction with the fact that prisons are disproportionately loaded with these same men.

Is there equal and free representation? With the exclusion of felons, who are largely colored, there is also lack of representation among; Gays, “Leftists”(Socialists, Communists, Anarchist’s, etc;), but most of all, the Regular Working Poor, who only live to work, and only work as long as their cheap labor is profitable (Marx).  Leftist are absolutely unrecognized by the state. This is of upmost importance. On the one hand; ‘Democracy’, is meant to give equal and free representation. On the other; much of the left (Yours truly included), will not operate within the state, let alone reform it; ala the ‘nice’ Well-fare Capitalism, with a ‘human face’. Just as the Real Left would (and WILL) call upon the oppressed masses to suppress the minority ruling-elite (bourgeoisie) , the State, from Slavery societies, to Feudal, and our Modern Democratic Capitalist Society CANNOT and WILL NOT allow any representation. (Save the ‘Socialist’ governor of Vermont Bernie Sanders http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernie_Sanders).

Many politicians give hope to the poor, many scum politicians use this hope to get themselves elected. It would almost seem that many of these political ‘leaders’, are in fact a modern day Robin Hood, like Obama. While at the same time they are funded by the Corporations, Wall St and Upper-Supra-rich Class (see bourgeoisie). They make themselves, and those underprivileged and under-educated (due to the State) undergo feelings of solidarity and charity by giving hand-outs to the poor. Better yet they can only amuse the working poor. These are not our leaders, men like Obama, and many other politicians are POVERTY PIMPS. You are inclined to look at what has really changed for Our Working class, besides the increased exportations, increased arrests of political activists, and increased militarization of the police, escalation of Oils Wars, and New Oil Wars, and further cuts to the meager vital help that the working class receives for mere sustenance. Equal and free representation is for those who can afford it and those who DO NOT CHALLENGE THE STATUS QUO is not possible under the State apparatus that preaches “Democracy”.

There is some semblance between democracy and social control. The “pioneers” of Democracy were the ancient Greek Athenians. Who also excluded women, slaves, and once again even those men who did not have enough wealth (the majority). The reason for this is that as those who exploited the masses, gained more power, and more influence. And for them the Most Important issue on the To Do list was suppression, division and sabotage of the masses for the benefit of their rule. This State Democracy is at the fore front of class antagonisms, for ONLY when there is a division of class, is it necessary to have consensus for ruling competing factions. When there is mixing Democracy with Warfare Capitalism, (i.e.; Amerikkka) your encounter empirical inequality. They Came and still continue to come to a consensus for the Subtle Slavery of Our Class. With every new generation Revolution is Essential. Solidarity is Vital. This Day, the time of Rule by Minority has become obsolete, and the Status Quo with it.

LISTEN UP NYC

Sending a message in New York City

BY JULIAN GUERRERO

ENTIRE ARTICLE FOUND HERE

“Bloomberg and Cuomo have put forward budget proposals for the city and state that would have a devastating effect on schools, health care, housing, child care services and more–all programs that poor and working-class New Yorkers rely on.

Cuomo’s budget plan passed the state legislature in April. His proposal cuts $10 billion for the next fiscal year, with further reductions of $13 billion, $15.4 billion and $17 billion in the following years. This year alone, school aid and the state’s Medicaid health care program will both lose nearly $3 billion each, and the cuts are even sharper for other programs. Reductions in spending account for nearly 90 percent of the governor’s plan to close the state’s budget shortfall.

Bloomberg and Cuomo want poor and working New Yorkers to pay the price for the economic crisis that Wall Street caused.”

International Movements

Gaza: Young Palestinians Lead a Global Movement

The following article, by Joe Catron, was published on PalestineChronicle.com:

This is an excerpt from the article, the entire article is here.

“The young Palestinians nowadays are very creative, in writing, blogging, video making; many, many things,” said Sourani. “I am very proud of my generation. They are so creative, really. I meet and talk to anyone who does anything: maybe blogging, a site, a Facebook account, a Twitter. Youth everywhere are doing fantastic things. They just need to be linked with Palestinians ourselves.”

“We want more links with people outside,” said Baker. “We want more actions and more communication. The more you communicate with people, the more the idea becomes big and it grows. And BDS is growing. Citizens, and students, and young, and old, are engaging themselves in BDS, outside and inside and everywhere. It is actually, in its core, a popular struggle, and it is civil resistance.”

What do they ask of outsiders? “The important thing is that they take action,” Sourani replied. “This is what we are looking for. We don’t look for passion, we don’t look for tears, we don’t look for romantic speech. We just look for actions. Whatever small action you can take is something beautiful. This is the basis of BDS, that we don’t wait for talk.”

“Let’s mention here the the recent action taken by people in the United States diring the AIPAC speech,” said Baker. “I think this was really effective, when young students stood up and spoke out for Palestine, students who had no relation to Palestinian identity, except that they understood the issue, they understood what is right and what is wrong, and they took action. Even if they knew that they might be harmed, or might get fired from somewhere. We think that this is really important, and this is a success for BDS.”

Morales/Shakur Center

2006 article: Student Activists Under Attack at City College of New York for Honoring Black and Puerto Rican Liberation Heroes

by Brad Sigal | Fight Back News Service  read the entire article here

December 18, 2006

A Center for Organizing

The Morales/Shakur Center houses various activist groups and projects. Students for Education Rights was the group that led the student strike that won the space for the Morales/Shakur Center from the CUNY administration in 1989. Union de Jovenes Dominicanos and Dominicanos 2000 use the Morales/Shakur Center for their activities, including running a Pre-University Program that works with hundreds of high school students from the community. Student Liberation Action Movement is an activist group at CUNY formed in 1995 in opposition to another round of tuition hikes. The Messenger, which was started as an alternative newspaper at CCNY in 1997, uses the center too.

The Politics of Race and Culture @ Cuny

By Christopher Day
Love & Rage Revolutionary Anarchist Newspaper
June/July 1997, Volume 8 Number 3

entire article found here

Building A Multi-Racial Student Movement

The key to beating back the attacks on CUNY is building a broad but militant, politically independent and multi-racial student movement. No single race or nationality predominates at CUNY. In order to mobilize large numbers of students on campuses across CUNY it is necessary to build multi-racial unity. But that unity can’t be built on the basis of simplistic slogans like “Black and White, Unite and Fight!” It must be based on an understanding of the white supremacist character of the attacks on CUNY and open admissions.

One of the biggest obstacles to building the kind of multi-racial movement that can win is the temptation to build the movement on the basis of the lowest common denominator and the narrowest of demands such as simply opposing the tuition increase. The problem with this approach is that it doesn’t deal with the fact that the cuts are coming down differently on different people.

The core of the movement at CUNY has always been Black and Latino students because they are the ones paying the highest price for each round of cuts. For a white student from Staten Island going to CUNY because it is cheaper than SUNY (the state university system), a $400 tuition increase will make them $400 poorer. For a Dominican student from Washington Heights, a $400 tuition increase may mean they can’t go back to school next year. Fighting the cuts has a different sort of urgency for different students. In order for white students to help build a multi-racial movement they need to acknowledge the way that white privilege operates within CUNY and the larger society and commit themselves to fighting it even when it goes against their own immediate interests.

The Struggle Over Who CUNY Serves

This is taken from “Some Thoughts on The History of Slam” found here.

The Struggle Over Who CUNY Serves

CUNY is not like most university systems in the U.S. CUNY was founded in 1847 as the “Free Academy” to educate the working class and had free tuition from 1847 until 1976. The large majority of students are from working class and poor families, and the majority of students are oppressed nationalities.

But CUNY hasn’t always been that way – continual rounds of student and community struggles since the late 1960s transformed CUNY from an almost-all white institution to a university that attempted to reflect the class and race of the students coming out of New York City’s high schools. In 1969, the few Black students that were at CUNY’s flagship campus, City College (CCNY) in Harlem, with support from the surrounding Black community, took over campus buildings demanding that the mostly-white City University should adopt ‘open admissions’ so that Black and Puerto Rican high school graduates in New York City would get a chance to go to college and get the support they needed when they got there.

After a series of building takeovers and fights against cops and some racist white students, along with rounds of negotiating with CUNY administrators, they CUNY administration gave in and agreed to open admissions for the following school year. Literally overnight, the class and racial composition of CUNY was radically transformed, and CUNY became an institution that to a much larger degree than before ‘served the people’ of New York City rather than being a mostly-white bastion aimed at mostly serving business interests.